Synchronize with the table of contents  INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION :

PROVENANCE:

Lula, Michael and Alexis Lubchenco and Portia Whitaker donated the Portia Lubchenco Papers in 1980.

ACCESS:

The collection is open for research.

OWNERSHIP:

Literary and copyrights - as appropriate - have been assigned to the Denver Public Library.

PUBLICATION RIGHTS:

All requests for permission to publish, reproduce, or quote from material in the collection should be discussed with the appropriate librarian or archivist. Permission for publication may be given on behalf of the Denver Public Library as the owner of the physical item. It is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which also must be obtained by the customer. The Library does not assume any responsibility for infringement of copyright or publication rights of the manuscript held by the writer, heirs, donors, or executors. Reproduction restrictions are decided on a case-by-case basis.

PREFERRED CITATION:

[Identification of item], Portia Lubchenco Papers, WH214, Western History Collection, The Denver Public Library.

SIZE:

Number of Boxes: 2 (1.25 lf)

Oversize: 1 OV Box, 1 OVFF

Number of PhotoBoxes: 3 (2.5 lf)

LOCATION:

WH214

PROCESSED AND ENCODED BY:

Ann Brown

October 2007

PROJECT MANAGER:

Ellen Zazzarino

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE :

Dr. Portia Lubchenco was born August 6, 1887, to Peter and Lula Cuttino McKnight on a cotton plantation near Charleston, South Carolina. One of nine children, she was raised in the town of Paxville, South Carolina and received an education in business and teaching in Edgefield, South Carolina. In 1907, she was teaching school near her home when she met Alexis Lubchenco, an agronomist from Russia, who was in South Carolina to study cotton cultivation.

In 1912, Portia McKnight was the first female graduate from the North Carolina Medical College. After her graduation, she married Alexis Lubchenco and they sailed to Russia on the steamship, Empress of Russia. In Russia, Alexis Lubchenco was a member of the intelligentsia, a Professor of Science at the University of Moscow and a friend of Alexander Kerensky. He and Portia Lubchenco had three children in Russia, Alexis Jr., Lula and Portia. During the summers, the family traveled to Turkestan where Alexis Lubchenco studied the growth of cotton.

In 1917, after the Bolsheviks seized power, the Lubchenco family fled Russia on the Trans-Siberian Railroad. In February 1918, they arrived in San Francisco, California, and traveled by train to Blythewood, South Carolina. There, Dr. Lubchenco practiced medicine and Alexis Lubchenco raised cotton. Their sons Michael and Peter were born in South Carolina.

After boll weevils destroyed the cotton industry in South Carolina, the Lubchenco family moved to Haxtun, Colorado in 1931. Portia Lubchenco joined the practice of Dr. Jim McKnight, her brother. In 1936, the Lubchencos moved to Sterling, Colorado. Portia Lubchenco was the first chief of staff of the Good Samaritan Hospital in Sterling.

Alexis Lubchenco died in 1941. Portia Lubchenco continued to practice in Sterling, Colorado, until she retired in 1966. She moved to Denver, Colorado where she resumed a limited medical practice with nursing home patients and retired again in 1972. Portia Lubchenco died in 1978. She is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Sterling, Colorado.

Among the many honors that Dr. Lubchenco received was the 1954 Colorado Mother of the Year award. Three of her children, Michael, Alexis, Jr., and Lula, became physicians. Peter became a civil engineer and daughter Portia was successful in business.

SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE :

Ranging from 1900 to 1982, the materials in this collection consist of correspondence, photographs, travel diaries, certificates and drafts of chapters of the book, Doctor Portia, written by Portia Lubchenco with the aid of Anna C. Petteys.

SELECTION OF RELATED MATERIAL :

Oral history interview of Portia M. Lubchenco, Colorado Historical Society Library

SERIES 1 MEDICAL PAPERS 1913-1974 BOX 1 :

Medical licenses and certificates comprise the bulk of this series. It also includes Dr. Lubchenco's memoirs about her profession, stationery and correspondence.

SERIES 2 WRITINGS 1944-1966 BOX 1 :

This series contains short stories and articles that Lubchenco wrote as well as drafts of the chapters for her autobiography Dr. Portia, written with the help of Anna C. Petteys.

SERIES 3 PERSONAL PAPERS 1902-1982 BOX 1-2 :

This series consists of awards and certificates, memoirs, and correspondence from friends and family. A portion of the series also contains Alexis Lubchenco's correspondence and articles, papers pertaining to Sterling, Colorado real estate, travel diaries and obituaries and memorials.

SERIES 4 OVERSIZE 1912-1979 OV BOX 1, OVFF 1 :

A scrapbook with newspaper clippings, photographs and correspondence about the 1954 Colorado Mother of the Year award comprises part of this series. Another portion of the series contains certificates, diplomas and naturalization papers.

SERIES 5 PHOTOGRAPHS 1894-1979 PHOTOBOX 1-3 :

Black-and-white images of the Lubchenco family make up part of this series. It also includes two boxes of glass lantern slides of pre-revolutionary Russia and turn-of-the century Europe left in their original order.

SUBJECT ACCESS :

: SUBJECT ACCESS - :

  • Lubchenco, Portia --Archives.
  • Lubchenco, Alexis Eleazer, d. 1941 -- Archives.
  • Lubchenco family -- Archives.
  • Women physicians --Colorado.

CONTAINER LIST